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Author Topic: Issues for a Newbie  (Read 711 times)

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Offline Old Crow

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Re: Issues for a Newbie
« Reply #15 on: October 14, 2017, 12:23:08 am »
Some interesting ideas here, thanks. Why would I consider soldering as a beginner? Cos that's what I keep reading so good to hear it might not be necessary??? Thanks for the advive to connect up the rails before making the curve - I can see that will help.

Offline Webbo

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Re: Issues for a Newbie
« Reply #16 on: October 14, 2017, 01:41:57 am »
Not necessary to solder the rails if you are using set track to go round the corners. Set track is code 80 so if you are using code 55 you will have the issue of mating two rail sizes. Try joining two sections of flex track going round a tight curve and you will quickly see why soldering the rails before they are bent into the final position might be a good idea.

Webbo
« Last Edit: October 14, 2017, 02:48:04 am by Webbo »

Online Bealman

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Re: Issues for a Newbie
« Reply #17 on: October 14, 2017, 03:10:08 am »
As in this hidden curve on the B & CE..... it's so tight it's distorted the sleepers!!  :-[



I've got no idea why the wire is soldered there, by the way..... it goes nowhere!!

More  :-[

This restoration job was never going to be easy!  :worried:
« Last Edit: October 14, 2017, 03:12:24 am by Bealman »
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Offline acook

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Re: Issues for a Newbie
« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2017, 09:39:33 pm »
Hi Folks
If you need more than 1 length of flexitrack to go around a curve, I find the best way is to overlap the joins by 4 sleepers, solder the fishplates and put the join in the middle of the curve.
This helps kink resistanceand spreads the loads out a bit better as there is an alternating  continuous rail opposite the joint.
You have to be careful to bend the curve before joining if the curve needs more than 2 lengths or it goes pants when the inside rail tries to shorten when bent.
How do I know This?
Alan

Offline Old Crow

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Re: Issues for a Newbie
« Reply #19 on: October 18, 2017, 02:11:37 am »
Yes. I'll be facing all of this in a while when I'm set up. I can see how, when you bend a track you end up with rails of two different lengths. I thought the idea was to then saw it level to meet the straights? I've got hold of a fancy bending device from Peter's Spares that looks to be adjustable for any radius. I'm using code 80 so yes, set-track curves might do. I have 8ft x 2ft 6" in the loft giving me an oval with 6ft straights, so I could use 12" radius, though I'd like to avoid too many joints.

Offline Webbo

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Re: Issues for a Newbie
« Reply #20 on: October 18, 2017, 07:59:02 am »
Yes, you can saw it approximately level to meet the straights. Then join one rail and solder. The gap on the other rail can be closed up by moving the flexi-track to one side or the other and then soldered at the join. I think the important thing is not to try to force the curve at the join before soldering. Unconstrained flexitrack will tend to straighten at its ends even when it is curved over most of its length and you want the rail sections to be joined in a straight line when soldered. Bend the track into its final position including through the join after all the soldering is completed. It really is a piece of cake.

The idea of staggering the rail joins as suggested by acook is something I haven't tried, but may be particularly useful if the track is tightly curved. I haven't found it necessary with 12" curves with code 55 track.

The issue of possible problems caused by rail expansion raised by ntpntpntp is an interesting one. Of course, baseboards etc. also expand when the temperature goes up so the situation is not so bad as it might be. Even so, I only solder joints on curves and I haven't had any noticeable problems of rail buckling.

Webbo

Offline newportnobby

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Re: Issues for a Newbie
« Reply #21 on: October 18, 2017, 09:21:39 am »
If you're using code 80 throughout then I'd go for set track end curves, especially if they are hidden from view. Keep life easy!

Online Bealman

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Re: Issues for a Newbie
« Reply #22 on: October 18, 2017, 09:33:11 am »
Wot he said, though in that photo above, I think I bent that Code 80 past it's design parameters!
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Offline Old Crow

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Re: Issues for a Newbie
« Reply #23 on: October 18, 2017, 02:31:35 pm »
Interesting the expansion thing. My loft goes from "Sahara" to "Polar" during the year so the odd unsoldered clip here and there might not be a bad idea.
I'll be able to use 12" radius curves on the main line in the space I have (really don't think I should saw through the roof timbers!!!) and yes, set-track is an option but on internal lines, what's the tightest practical radius you can get away with, just for info?

Offline newportnobby

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Re: Issues for a Newbie
« Reply #24 on: October 18, 2017, 03:21:20 pm »
on internal lines, what's the tightest practical radius you can get away with, just for info?


Sorry, but the answer to that lies in what you intend to run.

My branch line is all 9" radius curves with small code 55 electrofrog points (12" radius) but for steam I will be running small tank/tender locos and diesels will be mainly shunters/4 axle locos and max 6 axled ones e.g. the odd Warship.
The track diagram is in set track but no set track has been used (it's all code 55 flexitrack curved with a 9" tracksetta)



Offline Old Crow

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Re: Issues for a Newbie
« Reply #25 on: October 18, 2017, 11:29:58 pm »
Thank you for that. Your track plan gives me an idea of what can be fitted into a small - in my case, narrow, area.

 

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