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Author Topic: Wrenton  (Read 9861 times)

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Offline The Q

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #30 on: September 07, 2017, 08:58:30 am »
I hope I don't get a position next to you at a show, your work would show up everything I do :'(.......

we definitely need a craftsmanship button on this forum...

Offline rhysapthomas

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #31 on: September 07, 2017, 09:10:56 am »
Very impressive piece of carpentry especially as you did it mostly on a work mate

Offline daveg

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #32 on: September 07, 2017, 09:59:52 am »
Wow!

Dave G

Offline skel

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #33 on: September 07, 2017, 10:12:13 am »
Stunning modelling indeed! I agree with Trev in that it reminds me of the skills of Alan Downes but Alan had the advantage of detailing to 4mm to the foot not 2mm!

Very impressive and I am certainly going to try your techniques for my next build

And a very big Yes Please to the step by step instructions!

Cheers

Steve  :thumbsup:
« Last Edit: September 07, 2017, 10:23:11 am by skel »

Offline Delboy

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #34 on: September 07, 2017, 12:14:48 pm »
Hi Roger,
Just read through your tutorial and made straight to here.
Your scratch-built buildings are nothing short of superb.
Well done.
Dennis.
 :thumbsup:
She who must be obeyed says I am spending too much time on this forum. I love her dearly but what does she know?

Offline The Q

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #35 on: September 07, 2017, 02:31:14 pm »
Stunning modelling indeed! I agree with Trev in that it reminds me of the skills of Alan Downes but Alan had the advantage of detailing to 4mm to the foot not 2mm!

Very impressive and I am certainly going to try your techniques for my next build

And a very big Yes Please to the step by step instructions!

Cheers

Steve  :thumbsup:


ERR  Allan HAS the skills... http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=15113&forum_id=15

Offline rogerdB

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #36 on: September 07, 2017, 03:14:02 pm »
ERR  Allan HAS the skills... http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=15113&forum_id=15

Perhaps we should change scale! They are stunning buildings.

Offline skel

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #37 on: September 07, 2017, 03:42:41 pm »
Stunning modelling indeed! I agree with Trev in that it reminds me of the skills of Alan Downes but Alan had the advantage of detailing to 4mm to the foot not 2mm!

Very impressive and I am certainly going to try your techniques for my next build

And a very big Yes Please to the step by step instructions!

Cheers

Steve  :thumbsup:


ERR  Allan HAS the skills... http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=15113&forum_id=15



Sorry, a typo! I have been following Alan's threads for a number of years

Offline rogerdB

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #38 on: September 07, 2017, 08:35:42 pm »
Pausing only to say thanks for the kind comments...

After a pleasant few summer weeks’ work in the garden and with the baseboard complete it was time for…

TRACK LAYING.

The intended layout was a fairly classic design, I think. It has double track roundy running lines, a refuge siding on one side, a goods yard on the other and a fiddle yard hidden behind the back scene.



I used Peco Code 55 with electrofrog points layed on ⅛” thick cork using PVA to fix it. Every piece of track no matter how small had droppers soldered to the underside of the rails and connected to the power bus. Control is DCC using a Prodigy Advance 2.

The points are operated by Cobalt motors. As they require that the spring in the points should be removed I also cut away the housing for the spring along with quite a lot of other plastic around the tie bar area. The dropper from the stock rails was bonded to the blades (strictly speaking the closure rails, I believe). I cut through the closure rails close to the frog and switched the polarity of the frog using the switch built into the Cobalt. Here’s one of the points after ballasting:



The track in the scenic area was laid by September 2014 and ballasting was well under way when I took this photo at the end of the month:



I used Woodland Scenics fine ballast, mixing two parts of buff to one brown. It was fixed with WS Scenic Cement – no need to thin it or pre-soak the ballast as is the case when using PVA.

And now there were trains:



The next two photos show how the layout looked in mid-October 2014 with the ballasting complete.

In order to get an idea of how the buildings of the village could be arranged I placed those already built and used small boxes (which will probably look familiar to you) to make up the numbers. I’d made up a couple of Metcalfe kits – the country station buildings and the goods shed – and also some crude (and short) platforms. These would be replaced with scratch built structures in due course. The white shape in the foreground of the first picture is the footprint of a church. Clearly too large, the church had to be shrunk somewhat, but that’s another story.





There was one important change of plan during the track laying process. Although I had worked out how big the baseboard could be to fit comfortably in the room, a way of lengthening it slightly came to me while I was laying the track. At one end of the room is a curved bay window. Routine access to the windows wouldn't be compromised if a small, round extension was hinged to the end of the baseboard so that it could be lowered out of the way when necessary. Tight fitting hinges were used to minimise risk of mis-alignment of the track. The extension is supported by a couple of wooden brackets which are also hinged to the end of the main baseboard.



The back scene will go at the end of the baseboard proper and the extension is usually protected by a suitably shaped removable cover made from 5mm foam board which is held in the right position by the two small white pieces visible in the photo.

This small extra length allowed the visible track approaching this end of the layout to take a gentle curve instead of a sharp left and it also added a few inches to the length of the fiddle yard sidings.

Talking of the fiddle yard, here it is:



At the ends of each road I included a short isolated section, long enough to comfortably house the longest loco. The power to these sections is routed through the auxiliary switches in the point motors so that the whole route to the main line has to be set before the section is powered. This prevents accidental starting of trains when the required route isn’t set and, more usefully, stops a train when it gets back to the fiddle yard if another route has been set for the next departure. I find this makes operation easier as I can be driving a second train without having to worry about stopping the first one!

In order to help my ageing eyes to see more easily which route is set I added an indicator at each end of the fiddle yard. The LEDs are fed from the track feeds to the isolated sections. Red indicates go in this case – Maplin didn’t have enough green ones in stock when I went to buy them! The numbers on the display match the route numbers on the controller. Add ten for the routes at the other end of the fiddle yard.



The back scene was made by fixing ⅛” plywood to the baseboard cross pieces with  about a foot standing above baseboard level. In order to achieve rounded corners I glued Daler board to the ply. This was in turn covered with lengths of thick paper which hid the joints. Not a very elegant solution but it seems to work. A suggestion of sky was then painted using artists’ Alkyd colours.



The Daler board corners can be curved to quite a small radius. In this later photo the corner has some clump foliage glued to it – they are very low relief trees! And I'd re-painted the sky.



In order to keep the thin ply fairly straight two lengths of  timber were fixed along the back. These were screwed to the ply before the Daler board was glued into place. The lower of the two serves a double purpose, supporting some covers made of 5mm foam board which keep all the stock in the fiddle yard relatively free of dust.



Track laying wasn't my favourite part of the build, ballasting even less so! So next I was pleased to get back to making some buildings.

Offline Innovationgame

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #39 on: September 08, 2017, 08:18:58 am »
Wow! That's a serious package of work. Congratulations on a thoroughly good project.
With kind regards
Laurence

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #40 on: September 08, 2017, 09:43:29 am »
Superb work. Many thanks for all the excellent photos. and useful details.

Offline 25901JFM

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #41 on: September 08, 2017, 12:00:23 pm »
That is an amazing piece of work!  Thank you for sharing it with us.
John

Offline rogerdB

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #42 on: September 08, 2017, 12:05:49 pm »
The next job was to construct

THE STATION BUILDINGS AND PLATFORMS.

These kept me busy in late 2014 and early 2015. As the village buildings are based on those in a small area of north Essex it seemed appropriate to choose the GER design of 1865 as the basis for the station.

It's the first building I've made using a Portrait Silhouette cutting machine and only the second one requiring a brick effect - and a rather complicated brick effect, too. As usual I wanted to build using plastikard and the brick paper had to be fitted precisely to the plastic to get the correct alignment of the grey bricks around the doors and windows and at the corners of the building.

I made the three sections of the building separately, starting with the station master's house. Fortunately I had a drawing to work from which I scanned into Photoshop.



With these outlines as a guide I constructed the brickwork on separate layers. The result was printed on 80gsm paper. (The image I printed was slightly different from this, arranged so that the ends met in the blank wall, not at a corner at this version suggests.)



On further layers I drew the shapes of the window panes, the long curtains and the nets, printing a couple of copies on 160gsm paper.



The next job was to cut the plastikard. I opened the line drawing in the Silhouette's software program, Studio. I then drew along all the lines where cuts were required. In this screenshot I've moved the line drawing away from the (red) cutting lines.



Before sending the file to the cutter I shortened the long sides by 40 thou - this makes the butt joints of the 20 thou plastikard match the wrap-around brick paper. When working with that thickness plastikard the Silhouette will only score the material, it will not cut right through. So a bit of work with a sharp scalpel is required to remove the window shapes, though the walls can usually be snapped apart along the scored lines. When the walls were assembled the brick paper was wrapped around the structure and fixed with a wash of Mek-Pak.

Windows and doors were added before reinforcing the interior of the building – at this time I was using balsa wood as a lining, not the foam board I used today.

Here’s the result with roof, chimney and sills added.



I didn’t photograph the other parts of the structure separately but here they are assembled and viewed from the platform side.



The Silhouette cutting machine was used to cut the framing of the large area of window which fronts a small waiting area. And on the road side there’s a canopy which has glazing bars both above and below the glazing. The perfect match of the two layers demonstrates the accuracy of the Silhouette.



The platforms were built up using plastikard and small outbuildings were added:



The shelter on the other platform also has a large glazed area with bars cut by the Silhouette:



In December 2014 I tried assembling the Ratio footbridge kit but was far from happy with the result. So I broke it up retaining just the steps and the base of the crossing. I then used the Silhouette to cut all the ironwork for a new version.

Two pieces were cut from 10 thou plastikard and glued together to form each side. Here's a screen grab of the drawings of the long side of the crossing.



Here’s the bridge before painting.



Here it is painted and installed on the platforms.



The lamp posts use parts from the Ratio kits. I substituted a metal post for the supplied plastic one. The cross bars were made from a couple of strands of wire twisted together and round the post. A quick touch of solder holds them together. I cut a small square of black plastikard and drilled a hole in the middle to fit over the post and suggest the base of the lamp. The hole in the base of the Ratio lamp was drilled a bit deeper to provide a better fixing point. This is best done before removing the lamps from the sprue. The square of card, the lamp and its cover were glued together with Glue 'n' Glaze and the finial added with Mek Pak. A sliver of paper was wrapped around the base of the post and painted black.



Here’s a general view of the station.


Offline MinZaPint

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #43 on: September 08, 2017, 12:18:47 pm »
Well this is superb and like a good serial leaves us eagerly awaiting the next instalment  :wonderfulmodelling:
Cogito Sumere potum alterum

Offline nabber

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #44 on: September 08, 2017, 02:15:08 pm »


I love this photo - the building looks fantastic, the photo is taken from a realistic angle, and yet it's actually only about 2 inches tall!

Neil

 

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