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Author Topic: Suggested plans for a beginner  (Read 14087 times)

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Online PostModN66

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Re: Suggested plans for a beginner
« Reply #15 on: October 04, 2013, 06:19:20 pm »
Thanks for the interest NeMo

I think they were just intended to keep nasty radiation away from the train crew.   Then operation showed it wasn't an issue - or maybe the train crew grew to like the radiation!  :D

BTW - I have seen said flasks go through  Berko on a couple of occasions, late at night.

Cheers   Jon    :)   
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Re: Suggested plans for a beginner
« Reply #16 on: October 04, 2013, 06:25:33 pm »

BTW - I have seen said flasks go through  Berko on a couple of occasions, late at night.

Cheers   Jon    :)

I hope they weren't glowing in the dark......  :D

I'm sorry I'll get my coat.
Today's Experts were yesterday's Beginners :)

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Re: Suggested plans for a beginner
« Reply #17 on: October 04, 2013, 06:29:21 pm »
I should be thanking you for your efforts.

The idea of a starting a thread with beginners ideas that aren't the usual GWR branchline terminus really deserves to be pinned... or at least kept alive for a while yet! It's even better these ideas involve modern image diesels alongside a DMU (the Dapol 121 and 122 surely being ideal for this sort of layout).

I have not seen any nuclear trains going through Berko yet; have to watch out for it!

Have a great weekend, all!

Cheers, NeMo

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Re: Suggested plans for a beginner
« Reply #18 on: October 04, 2013, 06:33:43 pm »
Quote
I noticed that Farish are bringing out some proper nuclear flask barrier wagons; apparently some type of modified (?) HAA-like hopper. Given that the flasks are meant to be indestructible, what's the job of the barrier wagons?

Cheers, NeMo

More metal between point of impact and the flask ! I suppose you could also say it would make it near impossible to get to the flask via the roof, I can just imagine some crazy terrorist trying to climb up the inside of the hopper in vain...!
If it's got rails... you have my full, undivided attention - Steam, diesel and electric, 'tis all good !

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Offline NeMo

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Re: Suggested plans for a beginner
« Reply #19 on: October 04, 2013, 06:40:28 pm »
Do you remember the Mark Thomas Comedy Product episode about the nuclear flask train? Probably much different now, but in 1998 apparently the driver had to abandon his train in Dungeness to go open the level crossing, and once across, abandon the train a second time to close the level crossing.

Cheers, NeMo

More metal between point of impact and the flask ! I suppose you could also say it would make it near impossible to get to the flask via the roof, I can just imagine some crazy terrorist trying to climb up the inside of the hopper in vain...!

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Re: Suggested plans for a beginner
« Reply #20 on: October 04, 2013, 06:52:40 pm »
You could model that with some 1:144 armoured cars and soldiers!

Cheers    Jon  :)
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Re: Suggested plans for a beginner
« Reply #21 on: October 04, 2013, 10:52:33 pm »
I noticed that Farish are bringing out some proper nuclear flask barrier wagons; apparently some type of modified (?) HAA-like hopper. Given that the flasks are meant to be indestructible, what's the job of the barrier wagons?

Keeping the unions happy  :D It provides a bit of distance between the flasks and the loco. There were real worries about radioactive surface contamination of the flasks. They proved to be true with serious problems in mainland Europe. The flasks are now screened and decontaminated each trip to try and avoid this.

The flasks are not indestructible and there are some fairly serious worries about how they would behave in certain situations such as a fire in a tunnel which could get hot enough to melt one from the evidence of the chunnel and other bad fires.

Alan
"Knowledge has no value or use for the solitary owner: to be enjoyed it must be communicated" -- Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden

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Re: Suggested plans for a beginner
« Reply #22 on: October 06, 2013, 12:01:25 pm »
Many beginners seem to prefer a "roundy" layout, so in the same overall spirit as the shunting planks discussed above, I have tried to come up with a simple design that lets you watch the trains go by:



You may spot some references to well known layouts - (answers on a post card...!).  I have used 9" radius curves, since, if you are going to use SetTrack points you may as well.   If you built this you would just have to accept that big steamers couldn't be used, but they would look a bit silly on such a small layout anyway.    I have used R3 curves at the station though, to avoid an excessive "mind the gap" scenario.   There are seven points - (this risks getting out of hand!!!!  :worried:)

It is mostly SetTrack, but a couple of pieces of flexi track are in there to give it a more flowing feel.   This I would suggest as a reasonable challenge for a beginner, but you could straighten things up and use all SetTrack if you wished.

The industry could be wagon repair works, a steel distributor or general rail served factory.  The tracks poke through the backscene so you can load/unload wagons if you wish. There is a headshunt so that you could operate with a two-controller set up, general shunting happening at the factory whilst through trains pass in either direction.

Equally, the arrangement could be used for a loco shed, an unrealistically small quarry or even the Nuclear flask unloading as discussed above.

Any better/different ideas....?!

Cheers    Jon    :)
« Last Edit: October 06, 2013, 12:09:17 pm by PostModN66, Reason: Typos »
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Re: Suggested plans for a beginner
« Reply #23 on: October 06, 2013, 01:15:27 pm »
Would that be another factory belonging to "Rocket Industrial Products" nestling against the back board Jon?  ;D

If a beginner was to have a go at this one as long as he/she remembered to make the hill high enough to allow access for that 'hidden' point from the fiddle area, it would be a good roundy with many variables as to its sidings use. 

One day a factory needing vans and BAA steel carriers and the next day/week a different factory for,say Armitage, needing clay using slurry tankers, CDA's or even clay hoods. That way it would be a little harder to get bored with the same goods wagons. The only restraint would be the individual's imagination.

I think this little roundy will be hard to beat as an "apprentice" piece, given the size of the board and with an uncomplicated fiddle area.

Once the individual moves on the layout would make a good test track for running in new locos or ones that have been stripped down for full servicing.

Today's Experts were yesterday's Beginners :)

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Re: Suggested plans for a beginner
« Reply #24 on: October 06, 2013, 01:27:23 pm »
Many beginners seem to prefer a "roundy" layout, so in the same overall spirit as the shunting planks discussed above, I have tried to come up with a simple design that lets you watch the trains go by:



You may spot some references to well known layouts - (answers on a post card...!).  I have used 9" radius curves, since, if you are going to use SetTrack points you may as well.   If you built this you would just have to accept that big steamers couldn't be used, but they would look a bit silly on such a small layout anyway.    I have used R3 curves at the station though, to avoid an excessive "mind the gap" scenario.   There are seven points - (this risks getting out of hand!!!!  :worried:)

It is mostly SetTrack, but a couple of pieces of flexi track are in there to give it a more flowing feel.   This I would suggest as a reasonable challenge for a beginner, but you could straighten things up and use all SetTrack if you wished.

The industry could be wagon repair works, a steel distributor or general rail served factory.  The tracks poke through the backscene so you can load/unload wagons if you wish. There is a headshunt so that you could operate with a two-controller set up, general shunting happening at the factory whilst through trains pass in either direction.

Equally, the arrangement could be used for a loco shed, an unrealistically small quarry or even the Nuclear flask unloading as discussed above.

Any better/different ideas....?!

Cheers    Jon    :)


Looks great. A sensibly simple plan yet one which will have sufficient operating potential that you will not get bored too quickly.

The goods facilities (Warehouses?) poking through the backscene gives all sorts of operating ideas, and need not necesarily be for the same industry/purpose.

Depending on era it could be a simple goods shed (rest of sidings going offscene under a bridge representing the rest of the goods Yard) or for something more modern maybe part coal concentration depot and part steel unloading facility?

Looking forward to seeing this one develop with great interest.

Regards

Roy

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Re: Suggested plans for a beginner
« Reply #25 on: October 06, 2013, 03:01:06 pm »
Would that be another factory belonging to "Rocket Industrial Products" nestling against the back board Jon?  ;D


Ah ha Jack - maybe one of the "well known layouts" I was referring to!!!  I always say, if you have one good idea, milk it for all it's worth!

Thanks for positive comments Jack and Roy.    I like the idea of the china clay; could even be a china clay loading point for a western region layout.

Cheers   Jon 
“We must conduct research and then accept the results. If they don't stand up to experimentation, Buddha's own words must be rejected.” ― Dalai Lama XIV

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Offline Rabs

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Re: Suggested plans for a beginner
« Reply #26 on: October 06, 2013, 05:06:25 pm »
I really like the idea of this thread - it would make a great sticky for a 'welcome' area of the forum.

One thing I've seen come up a few times is that quite a few of the nice new modern locos (exactly the ones which entice people into N gauge) won't go round 9" radius or set-track points and this has led to some disappointment for newbies who don't realise this before shelling out.  Perhaps a good beginner layout would avoid these sharp corners so that any rolling stock will be ok?

I can't imagine anything as offputting to find out that my first £80+ loco won't go round my first loop or derails every time it goes through the points...

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Re: Suggested plans for a beginner
« Reply #27 on: October 06, 2013, 05:40:18 pm »
A very good point. Perhaps one approach might be to suggest some reliable rolling stock that isn't going to stutter over points or derail round sharp bends.

So something like the Dapol 22 or 26, or Farish 24, as good "beginners" locomotives. I think they're more reliable than 0-6-0 shunters that seem to be more sensitive to track laying (or ballasting) faults. They're also small enough to make sense on a single-track branchline. But what about wagons? Or coaches? Any thoughts?

Personally, looking at my cupboard of stock, I find I only run about half the locomotives and about the half the wagons. I wish I'd been more careful when shopping to stick with items that (a) worked well and (b) made sense on the layout/era I've ended up with. E.g., I've got eight Speedlink VGA vans that I don't really have much use for, but seemed like a good idea at the time!

Cheers, NeMo

I can't imagine anything as offputting to find out that my first £80+ loco won't go round my first loop or derails every time it goes through the points...

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Re: Suggested plans for a beginner
« Reply #28 on: October 06, 2013, 06:27:48 pm »
One thing I've seen come up a few times is that quite a few of the nice new modern locos (exactly the ones which entice people into N gauge) won't go round 9" radius or set-track points and this has led to some disappointment for newbies who don't realise this before shelling out. 


It's a great point Rabs, and presents a real dilemma when you are designing a layout.   It is relatively easy to substitute R2 for R1 curves, but it is pointless (!) to do so if you stick to SetTrack points.  As soon as you use the smallest radius Streamline points the layout suddenly becomes a lot bigger.  What we need is Peco to bring out an R2 SetTrack point!

My thinking though behind these layouts is that they are quick to finish so you can move on to your proper layout; so maybe park your 9F in a spare siding waiting its turn for a few weeks.

Of course, being a diesely guy it doesn't matter to me so much - "Lofthole" uses 8.5" radius Kato curves with (almost) no problems!

In the same spirit I have come up with another version of the "roundy" - I have added another track in the station, which you could treat as either a passing loop or junction.  Either way it adds another operating dimension - anticlockwise trains having to wait in the station for a clockwise train to pass.  It also gives you capacity for one more short train.



Cheers   Jon :)

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Re: Suggested plans for a beginner
« Reply #29 on: October 06, 2013, 07:15:01 pm »
In response to Rab's comment, here is a version that uses R2 curves, but on the outer loop only.  So you can drive your 9F round, but you must take the outside loops in station and fiddle yard loop, and you can't shunt the yard with it.

Would this be an acceptable compromise?

It comes out a couple of inches bigger, so still reasonably compact



Cheers

Jon   :)
“We must conduct research and then accept the results. If they don't stand up to experimentation, Buddha's own words must be rejected.” ― Dalai Lama XIV

My Postmodern Image Layouts

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Deansmoor http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=14741.msg146381#msg146381

 

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