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Author Topic: Making buildings kits  (Read 452 times)

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Offline hillside

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Making buildings kits
« on: August 09, 2017, 04:25:25 pm »
I've made a start on a Kestrel Designs water tower and the Ancorton Models engine shed.  I've not done any model making for over 40 years (I used to make Historex Napoleonic figures before I discovered girls and beer) and my modelling skills are somewhat rusty to say the least.

I've a couple of questions I'd like to ask:

1 - What filler do you use to fill gaps (hide joins) in wooden and plastic kits?

2 - When it comes to painting buildings, do you paint them as pristine examples and then weather them, or do you paint them "weathered" as you go along, if that makes sense?

3 - Acrylic or enamel paint and why? - I expect this will open a whole can of worms ;-)

4 - Brush paint or airbrush larger areas?

Thanks in anticipation.
"Experience is the name everyone gives to their mistakes" - Oscar Wilde

Offline Dorsetmike

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Re: Making buildings kits
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2017, 04:56:27 pm »
If a kit has been properly designed and assembled there should no gaps to fill, corners and joins are usually chamfered.  On card models corners/joins and things like window and door openings will show a white line - the edge of the card, normal practice is to lightly go over the white with a suitable colour felt tip pen; for the door and window openings it's best to do those before asembly and work from the back of the piece, that way if the pen slips any mark will be inside the building and thus unlikely to be seen -like this, (grey stone wall therefore grey felt tip.)

Cheers MIKE


How many roads must a man walk down ... ... ... ... ... before he knows he's lost!

Offline hillside

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Re: Making buildings kits
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2017, 05:11:50 pm »
If a kit has been properly designed and assembled there should no gaps to fill, corners and joins are usually chamfered.  On card models corners/joins and things like window and door openings will show a white line - the edge of the card, normal practice is to lightly go over the white with a suitable colour felt tip pen; for the door and window openings it's best to do those before asembly and work from the back of the piece, that way if the pen slips any mark will be inside the building and thus unlikely to be seen -like this, (grey stone wall therefore grey felt tip.)




Hi Dorsetmike,

Thank you.  I knew about painting the edge of cardboard kits (Metcalfe's etc.), but I was specifically asking about wood and plastic kits.  Even if the kit has been correctly designed, it was the error factor on my behalf I was enquiring about, and what to use to fill any gaps.  It was 40 odd years ago since I made any models and "technology" or "product technology" has moved on rapidly.
"Experience is the name everyone gives to their mistakes" - Oscar Wilde

Online keithfre

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Re: Making buildings kits
« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2017, 06:01:46 pm »
Milliput is a popular filler.

Offline ozzie Bill.

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Re: Making buildings kits
« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2017, 10:17:58 pm »
Hi Hillside and welcome.
There are a lot of branded fillers for using in model making. I like the Tamiya brand. They are very fine fillers, so will fill the very small cracks and edges some of us (me particularly) leave during assembly.
I normally put a blob of filler on a piece of plastic or similar, then apply it to the model with a fine point, toothpick, steel pin punch etc.
As to paint and weathering,as you say, can of worms. I like to weather after the model is complete, as that allows me to gauge the depth of weathering and adjust as I finish off.
Good luck and cheers, Bill.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2017, 10:19:05 pm by ozzie Bill., Reason: grammar »

Offline Webbo

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Re: Making buildings kits
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2017, 01:27:44 am »
Hi Hillside

I fully endorse the answers of others here.

1. I use Tamiya filler. It's the only one I've ever used and it works fine. Other types of filler are probably just as good.
2. I only start to weather my buildings after they have been completely built and painted.
3. Acrylic vs enamel is a good question with no single right answer I think. I like using acrylic particularly for spraying as it easier to clean and not so likely to be detrimental to ones health. On the other hand, enamel sticks better to plastic. Acrylic seems to produce better matt finishes than enamel even though the latter may be labelled as having a matt finish.
4. I like my airbrush for painting areas, but it does tend to use quite a lot of paint compared to hand brushing. On some of my structures particularly those made of brick or which have surface texture, I painted the first colour on as enamel and then spray brushed acrylics on top of that to provide the weathering tones. The airbrushing also tends to dampen down any gloss from the first coat.

A couple of other notions that spring to mind: If painting with acrylics onto plastic especially, it is advisable to wash the plastic first with soapy water first. Improves adhesion of the paint. I've found that when applying acrylic washes to enamel surfaces, the wash goes on more evenly with less blotching if it has been diluted with meths as well as water.

Webbo

Offline Bealman

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Re: Making buildings kits
« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2017, 07:42:57 am »
Just adding my three pence worth....

With plastic kits such as Ratio and Kestrel, and even scratch built structures using plasticard, I used matt enamels and then picked out the odd stone or brick. I then applied a dilute wash of acrylic which would flow into the recessed mortar lines.

It's been many moons since I built a plastic structure, but if I was to do one today, I'd use the same technique.

Pic shows scratchbuilt terrace using this technique on embossed plasticard.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2017, 07:50:39 am by Bealman »
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Offline Webbo

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Re: Making buildings kits
« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2017, 08:51:43 am »
I'm 100% with Bealman on this one. The acrylic washes can work out really nicely especially on brick surfaces as he shows. But be sure to use some meths (with water) in mixing up the wash as it breaks down the surface tension on enamel surfaces.

Webbo

Offline Bealman

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Re: Making buildings kits
« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2017, 09:45:17 am »
To a certain extent, the wash does the weathering for you. A gentle wipe with a cloth or cotton bud after application produces a satisfying effect on the stone/brickwork.

Well, to me, anyway  ;)  :beers:
« Last Edit: August 10, 2017, 09:47:34 am by Bealman »
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Offline Karhedron

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Re: Making buildings kits
« Reply #9 on: August 10, 2017, 11:46:01 am »
1 - What filler do you use to fill gaps (hide joins) in wooden and plastic kits?


I use Halfords knifing putty. It comes in a tube a bit like toothpaste and is very fine. I find it a lot easier to work with and gives a better finish than dedicated modelling putties.

2 - When it comes to painting buildings, do you paint them as pristine examples and then weather them, or do you paint them "weathered" as you go along, if that makes sense?


I tend to start pristine and then weather it down in most cases. Unpainted wood is an exception as this tends to weather a lot in the sun so I find starting from grey and then adding brown washes is easier than starting from a brown base and working up.

3 - Acrylic or enamel paint and why? - I expect this will open a whole can of worms ;-)


I always use acrylics. Modern acrylics are every bit as good as enamels and are far easier to work with and clean. One thing to bear in mind though is that they don't work well over bare plastic so always prime the kits before you start painting. I use Halfords (again) primers. You can get black, white, grey and red (a very good base for brickwork). Wargamers tend to have the best acrylic paints in my experience (if you can get over the amusing names). Citadel (Games Workshop) and Velejo being the best. Tamiya and Revel are adequate and humbrol acrylics are generally disappointing with a coarse finish and poor coverage.

4 - Brush paint or airbrush larger areas?


If you a doing a large building mostly in one colour then an airbrush can be good as it gives both speed and an even finish. Having said that, you can achieve much the same effect with aerosols albeit with a more limited range of colours. The buildings on my own layout were mostly primed with the appropriate colour of aerosol and then finished off with brushes. The exception was the dairy which has just been whitewashed and so is unweathered.

« Last Edit: August 10, 2017, 11:47:05 am by Karhedron »
Well, that's just not good enough. Some fount of all knowledge you are!  :no:  ;)

Offline hillside

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Re: Making buildings kits
« Reply #10 on: August 14, 2017, 05:11:31 pm »

I am very pleased with the results of an Ancorton Models Engine Shed I made over the past couple of nights.
It was a really nice kit to make - all the parts were nicely lasered. The instructions, though minimal were adequate.
It was my first attempt at making a building (other than Metcalfe's, of which I've had very mixed results), and I do think I prefer these.
What do you think?


"Experience is the name everyone gives to their mistakes" - Oscar Wilde

 

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