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Author Topic: Hailstone's Workbench  (Read 3001 times)

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Offline Hailstone

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Re: Hailstone's Workbench
« Reply #45 on: Yesterday at 07:22:39 pm »
Some time ago I found that one of my 9F's a weathered one had suffered the breakage of the left hand main driving crank pin, which also anchors the coupling rods connecting rod, and return crank to the valve gear. at the time, no one had attempted a repair and no spares were available, so I sadly packed it away in its case and put it to one side for use as spares.
I have just come back from a lengthy holiday abroad (you can do such things when you are retired!) and was running in a pair of Bullied Pacifics acquired from ebay whilst I was away, and had one of those Light bulb moments whilst idly watching them going round the main lines.
the idea of replacing the crank pin had seemed impossible as it had sheared level with the driving wheel face, but I had tested a superglue called 608 which I had bought at one of the larger model railway shows and had been impressed when I used it to fix a pair of SWMBO's glasses where one of the arms had broken just behind the hinge, this repair lasted for a couple of months until she fell asleep on them!
so I thought it might be strong enough to stick the broken crankpin back on, but it was almost impossible to get all the pieces in position without getting the glue on everything, then I hit on the idea of drilling out the crankpin completely and using a Gem track pin which I had handy, so I drilled a 0.8 hole (the size of the original crankpin was 0.85mm) right through the driving wheel, and drilling through the return crank I then glued the track pin to the return crank with the head of the track pin against the outer face of the return crank having failed to make solder stick to either. I then cut the pin to length, applied some glue to the hole, assembled the parts and positioned the crankpin in the hole then fed in a little more glue to the back of the driving wheel and left it to set.
10 minutes later I have a fully functioning 9F - I don't know how long the repair will last, but it cost me nothing but a little time - watch this space.......

P.S, usual disclaimer, I am just a satisfied customer

Regards,

Alex

Alex
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 07:25:55 pm by Hailstone »

Offline Jerry Howlett

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Re: Hailstone's Workbench
« Reply #46 on: Today at 01:22:06 pm »
Go Alex,

I think I may bring a bag of bits with me in September, and invite you to a game of Locomotive jigsaw..   :laugh: :laugh:

Cheers Mate, Jerry
Some days its just not worth gnawing through the straps.

Offline Hailstone

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Re: Hailstone's Workbench
« Reply #47 on: Today at 03:18:54 pm »
Go Alex,

I think I may bring a bag of bits with me in September, and invite you to a game of Locomotive jigsaw..   :laugh: :laugh:

Cheers Mate, Jerry

As long as you have all the bits to make one, I accept the challenge.

Regards,

Alex

 

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