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Author Topic: Help Understanding Signaling Requirements  (Read 237 times)

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Offline paulwdxb

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Help Understanding Signaling Requirements
« on: July 01, 2017, 05:15:58 pm »
Hi,

I'm building my childhood "home station" - Great Sankey. I'm trying to understand the signals I'll need.

Luckily signalbox.org have a schematic from 1963 which shows the signaling for the station and modest goods yard. I've attached the schematic.

Looking at the schematic, since I'm only modeling the detail between the two bridges, it appears I only need 4 ground signals, and 1 stop signal.

Am I correct? If not can someone correct?  :confused1:

Also, can anyone recommend a good manufacturer for ground signals?

Cheers, Paul



Offline newportnobby

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Re: Help Understanding Signaling Requirements
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2017, 07:56:50 pm »
Sorry I can't help with the signalling aspect ( :doh:) but it seems ground signals are available from CR Signals........
http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=3224.msg410887#msg410887

Maybe you could make some with a sub board twin colour LED and some fibre optic?

Offline edwin_m

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Re: Help Understanding Signaling Requirements
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2017, 09:10:38 pm »
These would be rotating disc ground signals, not the later three-lamp ones produced by CR.  I don't believe anyone does these in N, but they would probably be too small for anyone to notice if you just added dummies. 

The two signals just beyond the bridges would be very tall and the backs of them would be visible over the bridge - maybe something to include in the backscene? 

Offline MJKERR

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Re: Help Understanding Signaling Requirements
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2017, 08:27:46 am »
These would be rotating disc ground signals
I don't believe anyone does these in N, but they would probably be too small for anyone to notice if you just added dummies
Dummy ground signals are available, from P&D Marsh

Online PLD

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Re: Help Understanding Signaling Requirements
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2017, 11:21:28 am »
Depending on your skill level, the MSE kits can be made to work or as dummies...

Offline Lankyman

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Re: Help Understanding Signaling Requirements
« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2017, 08:33:18 pm »
You are correct that four ground signals are shown on the diagram. I cannot say what type of ignals would have been used at this location but in 1963 standard disc signals would be the most common in this area of the LM region. he exeption might be signal 8 controlling the exit from the sidings to the down main line. If there was a requirement to shunt past this signal into the headshunt quite likely it would be a black disc with a yellow band. Such a signal can be passed without the Signalman's authority provided the points are set towards the headshunt.

As for the main running signals there are, in fact, seven of them with a total of nine arms. These are:

Up main line:
Up distant signal, lever 24
Up home signal, lever 23. This is a very tall signal located on the "wrong" side of the line approaching an overbridge. For sighting reasons this signal has co-acting arms with the top arm positioned high above the bridge and the repeating arm at a much lower height.
Up starting signal, lever 22. This another tall post with co-acting arms because of the intervention of another overbridge and is just after the station which may have contributed to sighting issues.

Down main line:
Down distant signal, lever 1
Down home signal, lever 2. This is unusually positioned at the top of the post carrying the up starting signal but facing in the opposite direction and, like signal 23, on the "wrong" side of the line.
Down starting signal, lever 3 which protects the siding connection.
Down advanced starting signal, lever 24.

Note that I have the standard LM Region terminology to describe these signals as this is what was in use in 1963. Different terminology was used in other Regions and it was several years later before BR issued a standard terminology.

For those following Newprtnobby's thread on the Driver's position on the loco, signals 2 and 23 would be Firemen's signals for locos with Drivers on the left.

I hope this explanation helps.

Ron
Ron

 

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