!!

Not Registered?

Welcome!  Please register to view all of the new posts and forum boards - some of which are hidden to guests.  After registering and gaining 10 posts you will be able to sell and buy items on our N'porium.

If you have any problems registering, then please check your spam filter before emailing us.  Hotmail users seem to find their emails in the Junk folder.


Thanks for reading,
The NGF Staff.

Author Topic: Continental model manufacturers - how do they stack up?  (Read 5531 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online Gordon

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 761
  • Country: 00
    • Awards
Re: Continental model manufacturers - how do they stack up?
« Reply #15 on: June 01, 2015, 11:32:58 pm »
Running qualities of those high-end models is pretty good, . However, they are designed for show rather than day-to-day running and generally do not like tight curves (say less than 15" radius) or rough trackwork (having fine profile wheels).

Mike


I have a different experience with the prestige locos I have.

I have HAG and Fulgurex SBB Ae4/7 2-Do-1 (eight coupled) electrics, Fulgurex BLS Ae6/8 (1Co Co 1) electric - a long loco almost as long as some coaches.

All happily negotiate tight curves down to about 7 inch radius if not 6 inch.

Sometime Publicity Officer, N Gauge Society

Swiss Railways Consultant
French Railways Consultant
European railway expert

First British N loco (in 1972): Farish GER Holden tank!
Modelling French N gauge since 1975
Modelling Swiss and German N gauge since 1971

Offline GScaleBruce

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 317
  • Country: gb
    • Hillhead & Dales Light Railway blog
    • Awards
Re: Continental model manufacturers - how do they stack up?
« Reply #16 on: June 02, 2015, 09:30:02 am »
I'm also beginning to think every different pre-Hornby Arnold steamer had a different motor.  I have two locos needing motors, neither of which appears to be a current spare and both are different of course...

Les, you can get spares for pre-Hornby Arnold locos here, including motors - I bought one for a 1994 V100 (didn't solve the problem, but that's another story and not the fault of the Arnold spares shop!).  Might be worth a browse if you haven't already seen this site.
Bruce
My layout - Steinheim am Main

Online railsquid

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 25547
  • Posts: 3876
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • My model railway website
    • Awards
Re: Continental model manufacturers - how do they stack up?
« Reply #17 on: June 02, 2015, 09:40:17 am »
Ta, that looks useful.
"Eigatani Tetsudo" - Japanese and other trains (planning), featuring:

Offline Les1952

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 9060
  • Posts: 615
  • Country: gb
    • Awards
Re: Continental model manufacturers - how do they stack up?
« Reply #18 on: June 05, 2015, 09:02:32 pm »
Thanks for the link to the Arnold spares shop - I'll give them a try to see if I can at least get my 2-6-0T a new motor.

As to the Glaskastern- the "bin it" comment was that Minitrix (read Marklin) didn't really want to know about supplying valve gear spares- as borne out by the BR44 I had to scrap.

The attitude seems to be that of Hewlett Packard when I was buying large numbers of their printers.  Up to the end of the warranty period the thing is replaced.  After the end of the warranty scrap it and start again.  I even had a run in with them over their refusal to give a part number for a motherboard battery that needed replacing on a PC......

All the very best
Les

Offline Pengi

  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (+7)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 5227
  • Country: 00
  • Gender: Female
    • Twitter
    • Awards
Re: Continental model manufacturers - how do they stack up?
« Reply #19 on: June 06, 2015, 10:18:36 am »
My experience (EMUs)

Kato Lemke (new) - excellent, although coupling between carriages is 'delicate', very smooth and quick, can get top scale speed on Thalys, Eurostar.

Arnold (new)- ICE3  Dortmund, nicely detailed. Extremely difficult and fragile coupling. Smooth runner but nowhere near max scale speed. The front lights glow slightly through the housing.

Fleischmann (second hand) - ICE2. Smooth and can achieve scale speed. Don't like the couplings but not as bad as Arnold. Very pleased with this purchase - runs beautifully

Fleischmann (second hand) - ICE-T. This was bought knowing there were issues but at a good price. It has coach lighting fitted. The train needs a lot of running in each time it is run to achieve a working speed. Not sure if the coaching lighting is drawing power, but the train slows down with more coaches added.

Also add that all of the above were bought from France or Germany via eBay saving a lot of money when compared to UK sites. The only exception is Eurostar, my first ever N gauge train bought from Gaugemaster show with a discount. The Eurostar set a standard that Farish and Dapol struggle to match  :( IMHO
Just one Pendolino, give it to me, a beautiful train, from Italy

Offline Bristolmar

  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 90
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • Beer calls....and a prawn phall for the parrot
    • Awards
Re: Continental model manufacturers - how do they stack up?
« Reply #20 on: June 07, 2015, 02:23:14 pm »
IMO thr latest Kato offerings top even fleischmann in terms of build quality and smooth running
Beer calls...........................must run

Offline Addie

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Newbie
  • **
  • Posts: 5
  • Country: nl
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Continental model manufacturers - how do they stack up?
« Reply #21 on: July 11, 2015, 10:50:49 pm »
Almost all replies above make me a little sad. I'm starting a layout and ending my slotracing hobby.  I made up my mind to go British. After watching a lot of video's of Dapol reviews I came under the impression that Dapol makes good quality products for several  years now. Having gazed at many British layouts I found many of them to be very tasteful in colour and realism. Then I saw pictures of the Graham Farish buildings and in particular their church gave me the final push to go British ( please don't laugh, I know that there are far better reasons to choose a theme for a layout ). How do the new Dapol locomotive compare to the locomotives of the continental brands? Are they really 'super creeping'? Will I be disappointed with Dapol and Graham Farish?

About the continental thing; Under water our continent is connected to your continent. The only difference is that we would not have fired Jeremy.

Friendly greetings from here,

Addie

Offline woodbury22uk

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23382
  • Posts: 1395
  • Country: gb
    • Ebay
    • Facebook
    • YouTube
    • Awards
Re: Continental model manufacturers - how do they stack up?
« Reply #22 on: July 12, 2015, 10:17:09 am »
I recently turned out my old Arnold DB ET420 3 car electric multiple unit. Now this is a rustic 1970s design by today's standards, but after 10 years in storage it ran straight from the box with the filament bulb/light guide head, tail, and interior lighting all working. It is smooth and has a built in electric unit sound emanating from the gear train and motor which is quite convincing. It has negotiated every part of my layout without a stutter including some Peco R1 curves and gradients of 2%. In contrast my much newer Farish Class 150 DMU needed its circuit board contacts adjusted after just 3 months storage.
Mike

Over-user of brackets and quotation marks

Membre 0196. Association Française des Amis du N (AFAN)

Offline daffy

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 26722
  • Posts: 1203
  • Country: gb
  • Learning everyday
    • Awards
Re: Continental model manufacturers - how do they stack up?
« Reply #23 on: June 16, 2017, 11:05:46 am »
In the interests of reviving an old thread rather than starting a new one on the same or related topic........... :)


I have come across some second hand Marklin N Gauge Swiss locos for sale, said to be very little used as the owner was as an avid collector of the type (SBB Re 460 electrics) and rarely ran them, some having as little as 10 minutes of running, and others about an hour at most.

My researches show that most of these models were released by Marklin at the turn of the century, mainly between 1999 and 2002.

My obvious questions are:

1. Are Marklin locos that are between 15 and 18 years old, said to be almost 'as new', likely to be in good mechanical order? (Assuming the honesty of the seller, for arguments sake.) I have no idea for instance how the passage of time would effect motors, bearings and such.

2. Does lack of use cause specific problems for Marklin, particularly with regard to availability of spares? And finally,

3. How reliable was the Marklin brand in particular at that time?

I am tempted to take a punt on one of them, and any purchase (even on new stuff from major manufacturers today) can be a risk, but I would appreciate any constructive comments from the Forum cognoscenti re Marklin before I make a decision to buy as I have no experience of the brand at all.

Thanks.
Mike

Sufferin' succotash!

Offline ntpntpntp

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1188
  • Country: gb
    • Awards
Re: Continental model manufacturers - how do they stack up?
« Reply #24 on: June 16, 2017, 11:13:15 am »
I have come across some second hand Marklin N Gauge Swiss locos for sale...

Marklin N gauge as a brand doesn't exist - do you mean Minitrix (which is part of the Marklin empire) ?  Are you sure they're not Z gauge if definitely Marklin branded?

Minitrix have always been one of the top brands, I'd have no qualms buying models from that period, I run plenty that are far older than that.  If you fancy one of them, go for it!

I wouldn't worry about anythng deteriorating over time just through lack of use.  At most they may just need the tiniest drop of oil on a few bearings, but only if they seem to need it.  Avoid over-oiling.

Of course it's possible that mechanism designs change over time, but if Minitrix themselves can't offer a particular spare part there's usually a source on ebay even if it's from cannibalising another model.

[edit]
I've had friends' Minitrix Re640s visit my layout in the past although I don't own one myself as I focus more on German models than Swiss.  As I recall I think we may have had minor issues with the pantograph heads being a little narrower than usual and fouling my catenary (I run with Vollmer/Minitrix catenary with the pantos touching the wires but not actually collecting current).  In real life Swiss pantos are narrower than German anyway.   It's not a fault of the model, rather a fault with my layout!
On the other hand I may be confusing with Kato Re460 models which have also been trialed over the years.
[/edit]
« Last Edit: June 16, 2017, 01:39:07 pm by ntpntpntp »
Nick.   2016 celebrating the 20th anniversary of "Königshafen" exhibition layout!

Offline daffy

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 26722
  • Posts: 1203
  • Country: gb
  • Learning everyday
    • Awards
Re: Continental model manufacturers - how do they stack up?
« Reply #25 on: June 16, 2017, 06:08:02 pm »
Thanks Nick. Yes, they are Minitrix but I put them under the Marklin banner purely as Marklin and Trix/Minitrix brands are all under the Marklin company umbrella now.

However, I had been assured that these are Minitrix in their original  yellow and green printed plastic boxes. Sorry for the confusion.

I was interested by your comment about Kato Re460's as I have some current RhB items from Kato which are of excellent mechanical quality, but am yet to sample the SBB products they produced.

Mike

Sufferin' succotash!

Offline swisstrains

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 61
  • Country: 00
    • Awards
Re: Continental model manufacturers - how do they stack up?
« Reply #26 on: June 16, 2017, 09:09:45 pm »
Personally I prefer the Kato version of the Re460/465 but I do have five Minitrix locos from the period you mention. The Minitrix locos have always been reasonably smooth and reliable but I think the Kato locos are even smoother and quieter. This is probably because the Kato locos have nylon gearing and the Minitrix ones have metal. To my ears the Minitrix locos always sound a bit "heavy" especially on track that has been ballasted using the PVA method.
In terms of detail accuracy neither versions are perfect. To my eyes the Minitrix version body shape is probably slightly better but it tends to be too high above the rails compared to the Kato loco. Both have almost identical oversized pantographs capable of collecting current if required. Both locos have direction-changing 3 white headlights but the Kato version also displays a single white light on the rear as is sometimes the practice in Switzerland. (Gordon will explain when this applies ;))
John

Offline marco neri

  • Trade Count: (+2)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 510
  • Country: it
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Continental model manufacturers - how do they stack up?
« Reply #27 on: June 16, 2017, 09:51:50 pm »
Hi
I hope you understand.. :)
Locomotive leading the convoy: Three white lights on the front, a white light on the right rear. If in double traction, the first unit has three white lights at the front and the second drive a white light on the right rear. No light between the two units.

Locomotive inserted in convoy: no light in the direction of travel and a white light on the right rear. If in double traction, only the second unit has a white light on the right rear.

Locomotive at the end of the convoy: no light in the direction of travel and a red light on the right rear.

In case of emergency stop: three red lights at the beginning and end (if possible).

In case of authorized circulation (on illegal or otherwise): before two white lights at the bottom a red light at the top.

Shunting loco: three white lights on the front, a red light (or white) on the right rear. The same goes for a locomotive that moves alone along a single route.

Shunting locomotive: before a white "V" on top and two white lights above bumpers, rear two white lights above bumpers.

Rotatable end convoy: rear a red light on the right (even intermittently) or two red lights (intermittent, too).

Marco
...never turn you back on the ripper (judas priest)

Online railsquid

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 25547
  • Posts: 3876
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • My model railway website
    • Awards
Re: Continental model manufacturers - how do they stack up?
« Reply #28 on: June 17, 2017, 12:05:59 am »
Definitely nice solid runners. I acquired a Minitrix RE460 (I think) as part as a job lot, 90's vintage I guess, works fine. (Must get round to selling it as it's not my cup of tea).
"Eigatani Tetsudo" - Japanese and other trains (planning), featuring:

Online Gordon

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 761
  • Country: 00
    • Awards
Re: Continental model manufacturers - how do they stack up?
« Reply #29 on: June 17, 2017, 01:16:32 am »
Thanks Nick. Yes, they are Minitrix but I put them under the Marklin banner purely as Marklin and Trix/Minitrix brands are all under the Marklin company umbrella now.

May I humbly suggest that you never put N scale under the 'Märklin' banner. This is never done in practice. As with all companies, corporate ownership muddies the waters if you look too deeply into things ( for example if you look at the small print on dozens of well known food brands they are now all owned by Mondelez International, but nobody talks about Mondelez Dairy Milk'), but at a 'shoppers' / 'users' level,  Trix is the company that does N scale in the context of your post 

If you look at the main websites of the 'German' manufacturers, you will find that the brands are marketed as follows:

Fleischmann (Fleischmann.de) (HO and N)
Trix (Trix.de) (HO and N)
Roco (Roco.cc) HO, HOe and TT
Märklin (Märklin.de) Z, HO and gauge 1


Arnold is the possible exception, with Hornby now lumping all its European brands together - and modellers are using 'Hornby-Arnold' to distinguish current products from previous Arnold iterations.   
Sometime Publicity Officer, N Gauge Society

Swiss Railways Consultant
French Railways Consultant
European railway expert

First British N loco (in 1972): Farish GER Holden tank!
Modelling French N gauge since 1975
Modelling Swiss and German N gauge since 1971

 

Please Support Us!
December Goal: £55.00
Due Date: Dec 31
Total Receipts: £55.00
Below Goal: £0.00
Site Currency: GBP
100% 
December Donations


Advertise Here
anything