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Author Topic: Scalescene models  (Read 28238 times)

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Offline Bob Wild

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #15 on: March 23, 2014, 11:02:28 pm »
I rarely cut card by hand either I use a plotter cutter, I can cut a sheet of A4 card with 2 4 house terraces in less than 5 minutes and far more accurately than by hand with a scalpel.

If I could only justify buying a plotter cutter - 'er Indoors would go ballistic.

Some printers can print direct to card, that saves errors on fixing printed paper to card. however Scalescenes use of protected ODF files does make things a bit more of a challenge!

This sounds like a challenge worth taking up


Offline Bob Wild

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #16 on: March 23, 2014, 11:13:40 pm »
-   Metal “spike” – sorry I don’t know the name (!) but like a steel cocktail stick with a handle – useful for getting edges of folds square, pressing down glue around corners and also for scoring folds on card. I've got one called a scriber (I think, but I did buy it 50 years ago)
-   Cocktail sticks – for when you need a bit less glue at once... Definitely
-   Spare paper for using as a mat for gluing on. And again, definitely - to preserve the cutting mat. Incidentally, can you turn the cutting mat over after it is well and truly used?

As I’ve grown in confidence, I tried opening some of the PDFs in The GIMP image editing programme – and with a bit of copying and pasting using plenty of layers and guides, managed to bodge the station to add a cafe for the second long thin module. I even added interior bits like a bar, but without lighting it’s one of those “I know it’s there” details! Gimp - I'm only just getting to grips with this software. I can see that it is very powerful, but what an awful user guide! If only you could search for the topic you're struggling with. For me, it's the concept of layers and how you manipulate them. Any sensible tutorial here would be most appreciated.


Offline Bob Wild

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #17 on: March 23, 2014, 11:23:03 pm »
This thread is getting interesting. Just the place for sharing experiences. It's a pity John Wiffen isn't a member of this forum - anyone know him and could persuade him? Perhaps the Scalescenes topic deserves a Board in its own right.  But in the meantime let's all share our problems and skills. For me, the black art is still how to weather and add all that moss and slime we have up t'north.

Offline Gnep

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #18 on: March 24, 2014, 03:02:24 pm »
-   Metal “spike” – sorry I don’t know the name (!) but like a steel cocktail stick with a handle – useful for getting edges of folds square, pressing down glue around corners and also for scoring folds on card. I've got one called a scriber (I think, but I did buy it 50 years ago)

Thanks! Brain not particularly awake these days. I think I've also seen them called awls - beading awls? "Metal spike with a handle" clearly got the meaning across though!

I'll see if I can take some screenshots next time I'm in GIMP with a mini-tutorial - might be some months away though...

Offline scotsoft

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #19 on: March 24, 2014, 05:42:55 pm »
Perhaps the Scalescenes topic deserves a Board in its own right.

Rather than make another thread, I will make this thread a sticky so it always appears at the top of the list.
Once it has been going for a few months, it can be evaluated again  ;)

cheers John.

Offline Bikeracer

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #20 on: March 24, 2014, 11:09:09 pm »
There are other ways of making the PDF's editable,I need to so I can use a plotter cutter and put what images I want on one sheet.

Don't take this as advocating breaking anything copy written,just a necessary evil for my personal use in my case and I'll never share altered files with anyone or the originals for that matter.

Allan
I'm not a complete idiot..some bits are missing.

Offline Bob Wild

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #21 on: March 25, 2014, 11:07:24 pm »
There are other ways of making the PDF's editable.

Yes, I've imported PDF's too; in my case into GIMP. I did this to customise downloads. Recently to the Low Relief Arches to make them higher.

Offline Bob Wild

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #22 on: March 25, 2014, 11:13:20 pm »
About to start the new Gable Roof Engine Shed. Anyone any tips before I start?

In particular I notice the there are inspection pits between the rails. How on earth does that work, without the track falling apart?

Offline Bob Wild

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #23 on: March 28, 2014, 01:26:54 pm »
in my case into GIMP. I did this to customise downloads.

But I have a problem with Gimp. The colours are quite different from the original. I avoided the problem by screen scraping with a program called MWSnap into MS Paint and then cutting and pasting to enlarge the shape. The colours from Paint are OK, but it's not as powerful as Gimp.

Offline Dorsetmike

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #24 on: March 28, 2014, 04:54:11 pm »
I've not used Gimp, but the app I use ( Picture Publisher long since discontinued, but does what I need) can map colour and tone balance and  I can easily change colours I would guess Gimp has similar tools, for example I wanted Purbeck stone colour which is a limestone, creamy white when fresh cut weathering towards light grey,  Scalescenes stone I found was too brown but I was able to alter it to what I wanted.

Cheers MIKE


How many roads must a man walk down ... ... ... ... ... before he knows he's lost!

Offline Caz

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #25 on: March 28, 2014, 04:58:20 pm »
One of the important things when using picture programs etc is to colour match your the screen, the program and your printer to the same profile.  I use Adobe 1998 profile (the most common available) on my lapton and in my graphics program and in my printer and colours come out correctly.  If you want to go the whole hog, there are programs you can buy that come with a gizmo that completely calibrates you screen, it's what some professional photographers use but doesn't come cheap.   ;)

Offline Bob Wild

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #26 on: March 28, 2014, 07:18:37 pm »
colour match your the screen, the program and your printer to the same profile.  I use Adobe 1998 profile

So, I need to check if the profile of Gimp is different from my PC. How on earth do I do that, I've never heard of a colour profile.

Bob

Offline Caz

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #27 on: March 28, 2014, 07:26:45 pm »
The option to set colour profile should be in the settings of the various programs but not all programs have the option.  Nearly all printers have a setting for colour profile as do most computers, graphics programs vary, free ones often not but set as many as you can to the same profile.

Offline Malc

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #28 on: March 28, 2014, 07:44:17 pm »
About to start the new Gable Roof Engine Shed. Anyone any tips before I start?

In particular I notice the there are inspection pits between the rails. How on earth does that work, without the track falling apart?
Peco do one built in to a bit of track.
I'm not sure if life is passing me by, or trying to run me over.

Offline Bob Wild

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #29 on: March 28, 2014, 07:49:51 pm »
Thanks Malc - just wondering how Scalescenes do it.

 

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