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Author Topic: Scalescene models  (Read 30753 times)

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Offline TommyD

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Scalescene models
« on: March 22, 2014, 09:37:39 pm »
Hey all,

Does anyone have any skills at putting together scalescene models? ive got a few but i can never get them right, they always look like they were put together in a nursery class,

Id be happy to pay someone to help me out?

(not sure if this is against forum rules? apologies if it is)

Offline Bikeracer

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2014, 10:18:36 pm »
I think there is always a tendency to rush Scalescenes model,I've certainly been guilty of it in the past.

They seem to take more time than you think at first when you start doing them,making the window and door openings square and careful folding of cover layers round the edges and not rushing will make a lot of difference.

Like most things in life they improve the more you do,but as I said patience plays a big part.

Allan
I'm not a complete idiot..some bits are missing.

Offline Bob Wild

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2014, 11:14:07 pm »
Definitely a skill learnt with practice. It does get better as you persevere. A couple of tips I've found from bitter experience.
  • Get a good knife and change the blade often. I use a Swann Morton which has the advantage of having a thin blade, but has good support.
  • Use a magnifying lamp which allows you to line things up very accurately
  • I use Tacky PVA from a nice lady called Anita on Amazon which allows you to move things about after they are in place
  • Don't be impatient. Allow the glue to set when you stick a cover layer to a base layer before cutting out details.

And I'm still no expert, and I'm plucking up the courage to add some weathering. But, here's a picture of my recently completed station:
P1010067a
P1010067a

In this particular model I found it best to cut the roof sections in two. Then you could line each side up individually. In previous models I found that it was most difficult to fit the two sides after you have folded the two halves. Any small miss-alignment of the fold seemed to be magnified at the bottom of the roof.  And anyway, any gap at the top is masked by the ridge tiles.

Offline scotsoft

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2014, 11:21:59 pm »
You have made a great job of building the station Bob and the detailing is very tidy  :thumbsup:

cheers John.

Offline Bob Wild

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2014, 11:46:33 pm »
the detailing is very tidy  :thumbsup:

cheers John.

Yes, but, as you know here up t'north the buildings are anything but tidy. Covered in dirty grime and a slimy green mossy stuff. That's what I really want - but don't know how !?!

ParkeNd

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2014, 12:18:05 am »
How long does it take you to assemble a kit?

The point about taking your time is vital. My last scratch built model of a block of three cottages took about 100 hours. A kit isn't going to take that long - but it isn't going to be just a couple of evenings work either. 

IMHO the Swann Morton type 3 scalpel with type 10 blades is indispensable and ludicrously cheap from Amazon. But do look up on the internet how to fit and remove the blades with a pair of long nosed pliers. DO NOT TRY TO DO IT WITH YOUR FINGERS.

The right types of glue make a massive difference too. PVA, kit glue with some kind of impact tackiness, gel superglue, Copydex, and Prit-Stick, are all going to be needed - one glue won't do all jobs well.

York magnetic Mini-Mates make a huge difference to us newbies ability to make right angled glued joints like walls too. Having said this now someone will try to tell you that these are a 12 spend for cissys and that balancing bits against a set square is just as good - don't listen - join the cissys!!
« Last Edit: March 23, 2014, 12:53:26 am by ParkeNd »

ParkeNd

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2014, 12:56:43 am »
the detailing is very tidy  :thumbsup:

cheers John.

Yes, but, as you know here up t'north the buildings are anything but tidy. Covered in dirty grime and a slimy green mossy stuff. That's what I really want - but don't know how !?!

Dry brushing Matt acrylic on Plastikard Bob. Don't know if you can do it on card though. There must be some equivalent if you can't.

Offline Tom@Crewe

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2014, 06:32:56 am »
I am the same as most first attempts were quite shabby but with practice things get better.

one tip I have is when you wrap a piece of card say a pillar or building frontage, hold the part 90 degrees to a firm, smooth surface, (table top) and rub it back and to 3 or 4 times this gives a good sharp fold and flat edge. Do it on each edge and the whole building looks sharper.

Offline Bikeracer

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2014, 10:50:58 am »
Lightly scribe each fold line on the inside,it makes a lot of difference.

Allan
I'm not a complete idiot..some bits are missing.

Online Dorsetmike

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2014, 10:53:13 am »
I no longer use glue for attaching the printed paper to card, I print onto A4 label stock, paper or vinyl, 1 label per A4 sheet.

I rarely cut card by hand either I use a plotter cutter, I can cut a sheet of A4 card with 2 4 house terraces in less than 5 minutes and far more accurately than by hand with a scalpel.

Some printers can print direct to card, that saves errors on fixing printed paper to card. however Scalescenes use of protected ODF files does make things a bit more of a challenge!

I tend to scratch build most housing now, print the required brick, stone tile etc to A4 label, stick that on card and draw the wall shapes with window and door cut outs in the Plotter cutter software and use that to cut the card+label.

In this pic from the left a Metcalfe terrace, Peedie Models resin cast shops another Metcalfe terrace with added dormers and a bay window (Scale link white metal) on the right scratch built to match the size and style of the kits, changed positions of doors and windows,  chimney positions, ground floor extended forward  etc; Peedie Models etched doors and windows used in all buildings, that helps to make things consistent. Click pic to enlarge

Cheers MIKE


How many roads must a man walk down ... ... ... ... ... before he knows he's lost!

Offline Oldman

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2014, 11:05:48 am »
Another really useful bit of kit is a sheet of 6mm Glass. Offcuts often available from your local glass supplier- make sure they smooth the edges for you.
Nice and flat , any glue accidently put on it can often be wiped off- dependant on glue used obviously - but with card buildings no problem. 

Plus if you want to check underneath providing you  are careful when you lift it you can see the back of what you have worked on.
Modelling stupid small scale using T gauge track and IDl induction track. Still have  N gauge but not the space( Japanese Trams) Excuse spelling errors please, posting on mobile phone

Offline Gnep

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #11 on: March 23, 2014, 02:40:14 pm »
Definitely worth persevering and practising with Scalescenes models. I’m really enjoying learning the best techniques and have just completed a station (minus chimney pots so far) from the medium and small station buildings and their platforms:



I’ve found the only tools I need are:
-   380 micron card from the stationers – one layer for “medium card” and two for “thick”. No layers for thin card as I’m printing on to 100gsm high-definition paper, although sometimes I’ll use another layer of the printer paper back-to-back. I also used mounting board for some freestyle bits as it’s nice to work with (cuts cleanly and strong) but at about 1.3mm it’s a bit too thick for the “heavy” card in the un-bashed Scalescenes models.
-   Pritt stick and green (solvent free) UHU plus some PVA are the glues of choice. I’ve tried others but came back to this combination.
-   Craft knife and spare blades from DIY shop – one with snappable blades, which it’s worth snapping fairly often – certainly a fresh one when moving from cutting card to cutting paper, especially windows.
-   Metal ruler – although with a steady hand and practice the shorter straight cuts I now do freehand for speed.
-   Cutting mat.
-   Metal “spike” – sorry I don’t know the name (!) but like a steel cocktail stick with a handle – useful for getting edges of folds square, pressing down glue around corners and also for scoring folds on card.
-   Cocktail sticks – for when you need a bit less glue at once...
-   Spare paper for using as a mat for gluing on.

As I’ve grown in confidence, I tried opening some of the PDFs in The GIMP image editing programme – and with a bit of copying and pasting using plenty of layers and guides, managed to bodge the station to add a cafe for the second long thin module. I even added interior bits like a bar, but without lighting it’s one of those “I know it’s there” details!

I think I now have the confidence in GIMP (and we’ll see about the spare time!) to set about making my own building PDFs from complete scratch, even with an idea of putting my own textures together (wouldn’t want to abuse copyrights, even if it is for my own use only – if and when I ever get round to it I’ll put some details on NGF.

George

Offline Shaun Harvey

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #12 on: March 23, 2014, 03:44:39 pm »
Look at the George Street thread, its full of my scalescenes models. I agree with comments about using a scalpel as card really blunts the blade. I also use pritt stick and a tacky glue from hobby craft/world. Taking your time is key. Weather them too with weathering powders or pastels and take care from watered PVA if you are ballasting near models. Good luck and have fun.

shaun

Online cjdodd

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #13 on: March 23, 2014, 04:43:33 pm »
I've made a few of these now, and yes a sharp knife and metal ruler. And take your time,  don't be in a rush to get lots of  bits cut and glued and drying, one step at a time and leave it to dry over night if need be. Some of my models have taken weeks if not months to make.

Just practice on some smaller sheds and stuff first, get your confidence up.

Offline Bob Wild

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Re: Scalescene models
« Reply #14 on: March 23, 2014, 10:53:52 pm »
one tip I have is when you wrap a piece of card say a pillar or building frontage, hold the part 90 degrees to a firm, smooth surface, (table top) and rub it back and to 3 or 4 times this gives a good sharp fold and flat edge. Do it on each edge and the whole building looks sharper.

Yep, I agree. I use the edge of my steal rule to run and back and forth over the edge and it does seem to give it a crisp edge.

 

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