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Author Topic: The Train Shed Project - Marton Hinmarche  (Read 112144 times)

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Offline Innovationgame

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1920 on: January 24, 2018, 02:44:16 pm »
Yes, a buttress or two might be a useful addition.  Thank you.
With kind regards
Laurence

Offline keithbythe sea

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1921 on: January 24, 2018, 05:17:01 pm »
Looking good Laurence.

I agree with the buttress suggestion, and some coping along the left wall (similar to that on the wall on the extreme right of the photo) would add a good finishing touch.

Offline Innovationgame

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1922 on: January 24, 2018, 05:50:17 pm »
I began today with a concerted effort at improving the running of 6417.  To that end, I used my 3ml syringe and the Track Magic tiny brush to clean the pickup surfaces on the inside of the drivers.  Before starting, I checked its performance as a light engine and found it still to be very prone to stalling. 

I carried out the cleaning by urging a tiny bead of IPA to the tip of the syringe and wiping it on the inside of each driver on one side.  I then used the tiny brush to wipe the insides of the drivers as far as possible to spread the IPA and, hopefully, dry it off a bit.  I repeated the whole process on the drivers on the other side of the loco.  I put the loco back on the branch and re-tested it.  I was both pleased and surprised to find a great improvement in the running. 

It seems strange at first that it had favourite spots at which it stalled, whereas 9744 wasnít affected by those locations at all.  I have to surmise that the stalling was caused by several small increases in resistance, all in series.  So the track might have some spots of poor conduction the wheels might not contact the rails perfectly and the pickup surfaces may have been dirty.  In addition, some of the power rail joiners might exhibit a small amount of resistance.  The sum of all of these may have been sufficient to cause the stalling.  If the worst culprit was the pickups, 6417 would have been more sensitive to areas where other resistance was subject to a small increase.  On the other hand, 9744 didnít seem to be affected by the slight increase in resistance. 

After a couple of return runs, I was satisfied that there was significant improvement.  I replaced 6417 in its Ďhomeí loop and repeated the exercise with 9744.  This time, there didnít appear to be any measurable improvement and starting from rest could still be an intermittent problem.  I could only hope that it would run in a bit with time.

Then I ran the next three sub-cycles, including one Ďcí run involving 6417.  It was noticeably better than it had been on previous runs.  After that it was time to go to the gym, followed by the weekly foray to J Sainsbury.

When I returned, it occurred to me that the London Road Bridge episodes of 80119 might result from a similar set of circumstances as the stalling of 6417.  So I decided to give it the same treatment.  This time, I had my camera with me.



I canít be certain that it will have done the trick but, on the one occasion that 80119 traversed the section in question, it ran smoothly.

After that, I turned my attention to the Oakwood Tunnels entrances.  I measured up and cut out the first piece of stonework, again using the random ashlar printed on the new card.  I have located it roughly into place and must start fixing things into place and add more card sections to complete the job. 



Once both sets of tunnels are completed, I can add the embellishments to finish them off.
With kind regards
Laurence

Offline Innovationgame

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1923 on: January 25, 2018, 06:06:46 pm »
On Thursdays, we generally have a day out and today was no exception.  But I did manage my usual early trip down to the Train Shed and there is good news and some bad news.  I ran the next six sub-cycles, including two Ďcí runs with 6417 and it ran really well.  So well that, for its last in-run, I set the acceleration back to its original value of 25 and it still performed perfectly, which is excellent news because I havenít been able to set the acceleration back to that value for months.

The bad news is that 9744 was playing up rather like 6417 had been.  So, after a couple of runs, I lifted it and used the tine Track Magic brush, dry, to wipe over the insides of the drivers, to remove any residue.  That seemed to do the trick and it ran well thereafter. 

Today, we went to the small, but rather nice, transport museum in Hull, known as Streetwise.  There was plenty of interest, including a reconstruction of Cottingham signal box, a lever frame box with a block bell system.  There was even a short film running, explaining the block-bell system to the uninitiated.  I think a lot of the exhibits are aimed at the younger generation, but there were lots of interesting explanatory posters for those, who like me, are interested in the details. 

Later, I continued with the last four sub-cycles of the whole operational timetable and everything seems much better than it has been for what seems a long time.  80119 has had no recurrence of the London Road Bridge syndrome, but it did stall briefly at Point 25 when exiting the DOWN loops.  I gave it the same dry brush treatment and we will have to see how it behaves in future.  Forthampton Grange also continues to behave well, much to my delight.  I have now completed two full timetable runs without cleaning the track, so Iím hoping that this will continue.

Then it was time to have another go at the Oakwood Tunnels.  I have added some more stonework and fixed the portals in place against the hillside. 



There are still some gaps to be filled, but I think it is coming on.  Rather disconcertingly, quite a bit of the grass fell off when I was working on the tunnels, so I will need to add some more at some stage.
With kind regards
Laurence

Offline daveg

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1924 on: January 25, 2018, 06:32:18 pm »
Thanks for the update, Laurence.

A real pain that you've lost some of the grass from the tunnel covers.

I've found you need to be quite generous with the glue when applying scatter. For what it's worth, I use neat PVA for that type of material and a clear fast setting glue for heavier 'clump' foliage.

I'm getting this kind of result:





Dave G

Offline Innovationgame

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1925 on: January 26, 2018, 08:48:29 pm »
Today was a bit torrid in the Train Shed.  As you are probably aware, Friday is our day for getting all the boring, domestic chores out of the way.  But beforehand, I was able to spend some time in the Train Shed and I thought I would begin with a few sub-cycles before concentrating on the scenery.  But on the first sub-cycle, 1a, 80119 behaved appallingly.  So I thought I would try the dry brush treatment on its pickup surfaces, but that seemed to make matters worse.  I decided on a tail chase with 80119 and Cranmore Hall, in the hope that 80119 would eventually get better.  But it became worse.  I reduced its acceleration time to zero and, although it mainly kept going, it wasnít at all impressive.

So I invoked my Rule 55 procedure and ran 80119 alone.  I tried polishing the inside of the drivers with clean card, but there was a further complication.  Now it stopped on points where the free point blade was on the right-hand side.  Then I noticed that, when it stopped, the controller indicated a short circuit.  Eventually, I discovered that, in polishing the inside of the drivers, I must have disturbed the sandpipes to the middle drivers, which appear to be metal wire.  It looks as though the sandpipes were shorting between the free blade and the stock rail.  I gently bent them back with a fine pair of tweezers and that seemed to do the trick.

At this stage, I increased the top speed setting from 40 to 50.  Soon, everything seemed to go much better.  Gradually, I was able to increase the acceleration time, eventually up to 25, slightly lower than the value of 30 that was set before.  I tested it on all the stops and starts and everything seemed fine.  I then reset the top speed value and it all seemed OK.  So I revoked Rule 55 and ran 80119 and Cranmore Hall into their destination loops for the end of Sub-cycle 1a.

By then it was coffee time, followed by all the domestic chores.  Later in the afternoon, I returned to the Train Shed and carried on with the sub-cycles, to make up for lost time.  At first, 80119 started to play up again, but I persisted with it and it seemed, by the end of the session, toby running OK again.  However, 9544 was beginning to play up and after a few jerky runs, I decided to clean the branch again.  The cleaning session wasnít entirely successful in terms of results, but 9744 gradually improved after that.  Funnily enough, 6417 worked OK without any problems during this period.  Eventually, I managed to complete the entire first complete cycle, but I think that it might be worth cleaning the track after two full cycles (that is eighty sub-cycles with three trains running in each sub-cycle). 

So, there was no scenic work today.  I was also hoping to begin a descriptive narrative of the sub-cycles, starting from sub-cycle 1a.  But I think that will have to wait until tomorrow (at least).  Iím sorry for the fact that there are no photographs today, although I did post one on another thread, so Iíll show it here (courtesy of Warwickshire Railways)



It shows Coventry Station, as I knew it and, of course, as Julius and Marcus Dinsdale would have known it in 1959, when they travelled there from Rugby.
With kind regards
Laurence

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1926 on: January 27, 2018, 11:01:49 am »
I agree, you do need to be quite generous with the glue when applying scatter. I, additionally, spray from a height, a mist of dilute PVA to ensure total coverage.

Offline port perran

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1927 on: January 27, 2018, 11:31:33 am »
I apply PVA pretty thickly - no holding back and pat down the scatter to ensure contact.
It's you railway so build it as you want and run whatever you like. The only rule is - ENJOY :
My Layouts -
Port Perran:- Trepol Bay:-

Offline rogerdB

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1928 on: January 27, 2018, 11:59:02 am »
Being relatively new to the hobby I've always used adhesives sold as static grass glues. I may, of course, be buying PVA in expensive containers!

I've used Gaugemaster's stuff, which is made by Noch, and the War World Scenics version. Both work well. When adding extra layers of grass I use WWS Layering Spray, making paper masks to protect areas where I don't want to add more. When I'm happy with an area and the glues are totally dry I vacuum it and then spray with Woodland Scenics Scenic Cement which seems to lock everything firmly in place. The scenic cement can affect some painted and printed areas so again I use paper to mask the areas needing protection.

Offline Innovationgame

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1929 on: January 27, 2018, 08:26:36 pm »
First thing this morning, I only managed one quick sub-cycle, 5a.  Iím pleased to say that it went like a dream.  5744 ran really smoothly, as did 80119.  Forthampton Grange, generally my worst loco, also ran exceptionally smoothly. It just goes to show that there are good days and bad days.

We didnít walk in to the butcherís this morning because it came on to rain much earlier than expected.  So we took the car and took the opportunity to return some model railway-related items (in OO gauge), visit a garden centre for coffee and to buy some Christmas left-overs ready for next year, followed by a trip to Halford to buy a new cover for our aged trailer.  Unfortunately, the one I purchased was too small because the dimensions on the packet are those of the cover, not the trailer, so I will have to take it back and change it for the next size up.

While we were out the post came and the packets of corridor connectors that I ordered arrived.  They are the ones recommended by Mick (Newportnobby).  I order six packets because I have 57 corridor coaches, but I could probably have ordered less.  Firstly, there are only 51 connections required because none are required for the two ends of the train and, secondly, when I opened the first packet, there were 12 connectors in it, although the quantity on the outside was 10.  I started to assemble some.  At first. It was not clear where to begin, but I found some instructions on the website and it is all very simple.  Here are the first four.



When I went back to the Train Shed, I concentrated on making a video of the next sub-cycle, 5b.  First, you see 9744 emerging from the branch portal of the Gatsby Tunnel complex with the ĎBí set from Norton.  Then, 46443 exits the main Oakwood Tunnel with an UP, four-coach, local passenger from Leamington Spa.  9744 makes its way into Platform 4 before 46443 approaches Platform 3.  Then, 46122 ĎRoyal Ulster Riflemaní ruches out of the main Gatsby Tunnel with a non-stop express bound for Wolverhampton.  46443 finally comes to a halt at Platform 3 before Royal Ulster Rifleman thunders through Platform 2.  As it heads away from the station, 9744 sets off for Shipton, before we see the express disappear into Oakwood tunnel.  9744 heads away from the station before 46443 departs from Platform 3.  Finally, 9744 heads into the Oakwood branch portal before 46443 disappears into Gatsby tunnel on its way to Aylesbury.

 


Once I had finished filming, I concentrated on the Oakwood Tunnels complex, fixing the remaining stonework and adding a replacement patch of greenery, which you can see just above the branch tunnel, slightly to the right.  I added the greenery by squirting a few dollops of neat PVA onto the bare patches and using a No 7 watercolour brush to spread it about as thinly as I could.  I then used my teaspoon technique to add the grass and tamped it down with my finger to make it as firm as possible.  Then I sprayed it with a water mist.  Iíll see how it is in the morning.  There is still one piece of stonework left to complete on the far left, above the wing wall.



I received a small sign as a Christmas present and I have fixed it to the outside of the Train Shed.



I also fixed my smoke emission sign inside the Train Shed.

 

Weíll have to see what tomorrow brings.
With kind regards
Laurence

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1930 on: January 27, 2018, 08:35:28 pm »
That's put paid to any bonfires under consideration, of course ;)
Glad you got some corridor connectors. Have you got some Tacky Wax?
It might well be worth fitting shorter shank couplings to your older MK1s before using the connectors as later coaches had smaller gaps due to better couplings, I believe.

Offline Innovationgame

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1931 on: January 27, 2018, 08:39:14 pm »
That's put paid to any bonfires under consideration, of course ;)
Glad you got some corridor connectors. Have you got some Tacky Wax?
It might well be worth fitting shorter shank couplings to your older MK1s before using the connectors as later coaches had smaller gaps due to better couplings, I believe.
Tacky Wax is on my next shopping list.  Most of my couplings are the shorter ones, but I'll see if I can fix the rest.  My suburban couplings are far too long, although they, obviously, don't require corridor connectors.
With kind regards
Laurence

Offline dannyboy

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1932 on: January 27, 2018, 08:55:19 pm »
That's put paid to any bonfires ...............


I also fixed my smoke emission sign inside the Train Shed ..............


Forgive me if I have got this all wrong, but wouldn't it be a bit hazardous to have a bonfire in the shed?  ???  :doh:  :)
David.
I used to be indecisive - now I'm not - I don't think.

Offline tutenkhamunsleeping

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1933 on: January 28, 2018, 09:12:16 am »
Forgive me if I have got this all wrong, but wouldn't it be a bit hazardous to have a bonfire in the shed?  ???  :doh:  :)

From the health and safety perspective I think you'd need a sprinkler system at the very least :no:

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1934 on: January 28, 2018, 09:57:48 am »
Forgive me if I have got this all wrong, but wouldn't it be a bit hazardous to have a bonfire in the shed?  ???  :doh:  :)

From the health and safety perspective I think you'd need a sprinkler system at the very least :no:

That comes built in to every male, Steve ;)

 

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